Test your Thanksgiving Manners with our True/False Etiquette Questions Below

1. As soon as you are seated at the table and have your food, you may begin eating.

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2. If someone asks for the salt, pass them both, the salt and the pepper.

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3. At the beginning of a sit-down, family-style meal, food is first passed to the right.

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4. Cut up all your food before you begin eating.

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5. If a toast is given, but you don’t drink,  just sit and watch everyone else hold up their glass.

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6. If you have to get up from the table place your napkin in your chair.

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7. If you have to remove a piece of meat or a bite of food that you can’t chew, discreetly slide it back onto your fork and place it on your plate. Try to cover it up with something else so that it is not visible to others

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8. Crumble up your napkin and put it in your plate when you are finished with your meal.

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9. If you have to sneeze or cough at the table, always turn your head to the side and cover your mouth with the napkin. 

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10. By placing your silverware in the 3:15 or 6:30 position on your plate, it means that you are finished eating.

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A recent article posted by The Conversation, an academic content website, listed 10 ways schools, parents, and communities can prevent school shootings now.

Number one on their list to combat this major problem is for schools and communities to teach social and emotional skills.

The article states that decrease in free play time and frequent social media use has reduced children’s opportunities to learn these basic social skills. Children should be learning these skills sets in school, but often times they are not.

As an etiquette and life skills educational company, The American School of Protocol, completely agrees that children need to learn life skills. However, we have found that during the school day is not when the majority of this learning takes place.

Many schools have completely eliminated character building classes and activities due to academic pressure and the need to meet certain benchmarks on state administered exams.

Studies have found that schools only try to implement a character building program, once it is too late or as a buffer to help solve an existing problem.  Children spend more time at school and extracurricular activities than ever before.  The lack of  instruction from parents is now becoming more apparent.

Character Education, Etiquette, and Life Skills are all necessary to help formulate a balanced and socially compassionate child who can conduct themselves with confidence and consideration for others. Eliminating home economics, life skills and character building paired with our new digital era and lifestyle, qualified etiquette teachers are more in demand than ever before, but without instruction in the class room and etiquette teachers in the communities, the outlook for the future of our youth is grim.

After every tragic event our requests, internet searches and calls soar. We also hear from individuals around the world who have the same problem. The American School of Protocol’s goal is for every state and city across the United States to have a knowledgeable etiquette teacher who is offering classes to students of all ages.

We continually find underqualified and inexperienced instructors who want to help, but just aren’t accomplishing their goals. Etiquette is an unregulated industry.  This is why it is so easy for other companies to market and sell certificates and programs that don’t teach the information correctly or address the real issues.

We have developed our 5-Day Certification Training and a complete Character Education Series for teachers who want to make sure they are teaching  high quality, accurate educational materials.

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To parents, educators, entrepreneurs, we need you to step up and bring etiquette to your community. If this has been on the back burner, we encourage you to lay out your goals and make it happen. Now is the time!

1 Exhibit A Warm And Friendly Demeanor- No matter how bad a day you are having it is important to always be warm and friendly to others. This makes for friendlier interactions and can brighten someone’s day.

2 Look People in the Eyes – Stop staring at your phone and look up. It seems like it should be the easiest one to accomplish, however these little things called cell phone are making eye contact almost near impossible today.

3 Use Proper Table Manners At Every Meal – Whether it be an informal dinner party or a business event, always remember your table manners.

4 Dress Appropriately – Always dress for the occasion, remember that overdressing is always better than under dressing.

5 Hold Doors Open – Before entering and exiting a building always look in front and behind you to see if there is anyone that could use a helping hand.


6 Say Please & Thank You – Remembering the basic please and thank you can make all the difference. These simple words show gratitude and appreciation and are never underrated.

7 Let Other Cars Merge In – Driving can be stressful for many people, letting a car merge in can help move along traffic and improve someone’s day. Whether it is a car from out of town or your daily rush hour, everyone appreciates being let in.

8 Keep Your Unnecessary Comments to Yourself – Being malicious and embarrassing someone is simply rude and poor etiquette. Always be mindful and think before you speak.

9 Not Talking Loudly – Talking too loudly when you are out in public is not only disruptive but an annoyance to everyone around.  Sadly, many people think because they are using a bluetooth device that they can go anywhere and continue their conversation.

10 Treat Others With Respect – The age-old saying of “treat others how you want to be treated” reigns supreme. In order to get respect, a person must first show respect.

The centuries old pattern of ‘going into retirement at a certain age’ is fading away - - - and it’s for a good reason. Doctors around the world are now saying that instead of heading into retirement, you are better off staying in work to keep physically and mentally active.

Instead of facing retirement without a plan, many are embarking on this new chapter of their lives by reinventing themselves. Searching for a new career path, starting a business, making your hobby profitable, these are challenges that ex-retirees are finding exciting and purposeful.

After retirement many succumb to loneliness, isolation and health deterioration. With all the recent studies we know that going into auto-pilot, drifting without purpose only gets you one place fast.

The AARP Bulletin recently searched out ordinary people who have done extraordinary things with their second careers.  They discovered that 40 percent of people working at age 62 had changed careers since they turned 55. We found this article to align with many of the individuals who attend The American School of Protocol’s Etiquette Certification Training.

President and Founder of The American School of Protocol, Peggy Newfield says, “Seventy percent of the trainees who attend our program are planning for their second career. They are utilizing their new found freedom after retirement as a way to not only keep themselves busy, but also an avenue to give back.”

Peggy Newfield speaking to trainees during the 5-Day Etiquette Certification Training

According to Newfield, “With over 800 certified graduates, I have found that careers can take off at any age. There is only one ingredient that has to be there: PASSION.”

During The American School of Protocol’s five day training program trainees learn how to set up an etiquette consulting and teaching business. Through hands-on tutorials, small sessions, and class discussion each graduate leaves feeling empowered and ready to set out on their new career path.

“ASP’s proven outline and ongoing support is the roadmap to success” says Martha Berge who graduated from the program in 2015. After retiring Berge found herself bored and in need of stimulating work. 

“After working as a marketing executive for 35 years I was not ready to just lounge around. I needed a purpose.”

Berge is now using the skill set she learned during Etiquette Certification Training to reach out to her community. She is a keynote speaker once a month at rotary meetings and has a set evening every week where she answers etiquette questions at her local country club. 

With 15 grandchildren Berge also makes it a point to personally teach her grandchildren. “They find my sessions to be fun and truly look forward to it.”

Berge says the experience and skill set that she gained during the 5-Day Certification training has empowered her.  She now feels more connected to her family and community than ever before. 

“My children and grandchildren call me to ask etiquette questions. I have been asked to attend a local high school job fair and speak to the students about interview skills and how to land the job. The opportunities seems endless.” 

Newfield, who founded The American School of Protocol in 1980 strongly believes that those heading into retirement need to plan for this new chapter of their lives.

“Keeping your mind busy improves your chances of staying healthier longer. It’s a fact. Instead of focusing on ‘retirement’ we need to start thinking about what to do next.” 

Newfield strongly states, "You are still here and have something to offer. Don’t sit around and waste your time lunching and shopping.  Make yourself useful and do something you will be proud of."

To Learn more about The American School of Protocol’s Certification Training that is helping to launch second careers all over the world click here.

#1 Bring a gift for the host. 

#2 Offer to help to the host.

#3 Participate in the holiday traditions.

#4 Ask the host where you should sit at the dining table.

#5 Wait for the host to begin the meal. A blessing or a few words will often be shared to thank everyone for being there.

#6 Eat slowly and engage in conversation with others during the meal.

#7 Say something nice about the food and thank those who helped make all the preparations.

#8 After the meal is over, see how you can help clean up.

#9 Don't overstay your welcome.

#10 Send a thank-you note to the host expressing your gratitude and appreciation for the meal.

 

Awkward, inappropriate and ill-mannered conversations are meant to rock the boat. Encounters like these will make you ready to abandon ship and often leave you feeling drunk as a sailor.

What’s even worse is when you are held prisoner to this inappropriate dialogue which is heading for shipwreck because it is unfolding over a meal.

An interesting discussion usually makes the meal even more enjoyable, however even the best food can smell fishy when paired with unwanted dinner conversation.

Below are a few tactics that will keep you from being dead in the water when you feel like the titanic heading straight toward an iceberg of unfortunate conversation.

Know which way the wind blows

If someone asks you an inappropriate question, know the ropes and don’t take the bait.

Simply respond by saying “What an interesting question. I am going to need some time to think about that.”

Hook, line and sinker

Then, as quickly as you can, take the wind out of the sails and change the subject to something lighter- - - like how delicious the oyster appetizer looks.

Loose lips sink ships

If you can feel that the tone of the conversation will veer you off the straight and narrow guess what? You are the captain of this ship.

Quickly hold the topic at bay by linking to something said in a previous conversation.

Keep your head above water

It is always good etiquette to keep the response positive. Find something complimentary to say about the guest or topic.

Then, stay on course and begin moving full speed ahead.

Barge right in

You can also be more honest and answer with, “I really don’t want to dive right into the deep end … I just want to hear about you and what’s going on in your life.”

Rats abandon a sinking ship

Be ready to turn the tables and look for opportunities to engage in a conversation with someone else.

Sink or swim

If you sink you will end up with knots in your stomach.

If you swim, use humor as your lifeboat to steer the conversation into calmer seas.

Be ready to walk the plank

If the focus doesn’t change remember the restroom is a safe harbor. Kindly excuse yourself and take a few minutes to gather your thoughts.

Don’t let any conversation leave you high and dry. Throw caution to the winds and remember, a smooth sea never made a skillful sailor.

In the aviation world, these three words are considered a common approach to flying situations. 

Aviation studies have discovered that during emergencies pilots can get so focused on solving the problem that they forget to actually fly the airplane.

Being prepared and knowing exactly what you will do before you do it serves us well in all aspects of life. This tactic can also be employed to help you feel more comfortable when dining with others. 

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[one_half_last]You won’t be panicked because you accidently used someone else’s bread plate or so frazzled that you forget to eat.

Here are a few tips that will ensure you land once you have taken off!

Prepare For Take Off 

Avoid Turbulence

Final Approach

The Landing

The takeoff is important just like the landing and everything in-between, but the most important part is how you walk away feeling after the experience and how you made those around you feel.

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Location  Atlanta, Georgia

2018 DATES

February 11 - 15

June 10 - 14

October 14 - 18

Click here for more information on the Children’s Etiquette Certification Training. 

 You can also contact us with any questions at
404.252.2245 or email team@theamericanschoolofprotocol.com

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Newswire

Google

Yahoo

Bing 

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ePRNews 

Digital Journal

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Although just about anything goes with regard to tying the knot, some basic factors still govern wedding gift etiquette.

As a rule, a guest should always consider the couple’s wishes, their relationship with them, and their own personal budget in selecting a wedding gift.

Bride And Groom Celebrating With Guests At Reception

We have compiled the following outdated and long-held myths that have complicated wedding gift-giving for far too long.

1. Registry Required.  While a registry is super-convenient and ensures the couple will enjoy the gift – it is a suggestion, not a decree.

➤ Guests are free to buy from the registry or choose a more personal gift, as they wish.

Wedding Gift Etiquette

2. No Rush.  This rumor suggests that it’s perfectly acceptable to send a wedding gift up to one year post-event.

➤ A gift should be sent shortly after receiving the invitation, or within three months following the wedding (at the latest).

3. Tit for Tat.  Another unfortunate falsehood is that the cost of the wedding gift should match or exceed the price-per-plate.

➤ Guests decide what to spend on based on the couple’s preferences, their closeness to the couple and their own financial situation.  Period.

Gay Couple Celebrating Wedding With Party In Backyard

4. Cash is Crass.  Not so.  A monetary gift is often the right choice for older people with existing households, or when the couple has requested honeymoon funds or deposits to specific accounts.

➤ Money can be sent directly to the couple with a personal note, or straight into the institution indicated.

Couple Elope

5. Go It Alone.  Group gift-giving is not only acceptable, sometimes it is the best idea.

➤ Big ticket registry items can be out of reach for just one person, but perfect for a combined effort.  These are things the couple may not be able to afford, and therefore very much appreciated.

Despite the myriad of ways couples can fulfill their wedding day dreams, wedding gift etiquette hasn’t changed much.  It is still defined by the requests of the couple, the degree of friendship, and the guest’s budget.

By taking these factors into account, a guest can rest easy knowing they will give an appropriate gift – whether the event takes place in a centuries-old cathedral or on a cliff overlooking the ocean.

newlywed couple at the beach

If your curious about how much the average person spends on a wedding gift, Brides.com has run the numbers and their experts weigh in with some stats that you might find interesting.

Click here to see what they have to say.