With school shootings, cyber bullying and teen suicide on the rise around our country, our youth need help. 

The “do unto others” foundation of former generations seems to be lacking in today’s youth who have no focus on core ethical values. 

Children should be learning these skills sets in school, but often times they are not.  With many schools limiting character building classes and activities due to academic pressure paired with more working  parents, who is responsible for these teachings?

Children spend more time at school and extracurricular activities than ever before.  The lack of  instruction is now becoming more apparent with schools coming under heavy scrutiny concerning the well-being and education of our children.  

“In the long run, I’m not sure that it matters if a student learns algebra, but I know that it matters if a student learns right from wrong,” says George Booz, former principal at South Carroll High School in Sykesville, Maryland, a school nationally recognized for its character education program.

“I know that it matters if a person learns that in this world we have to help each other. I don’t see how we get around that.”

Character Education is a process of teaching children the importance of core ethical values, such as tolerance, respect and compassion. 

Character Education has been shown to provide a 23% increase in social and emotional skills, an 11% improvement on achievement test scores, a 9% reduction in problem behaviors and a 52% increase in graduation rate. 

Effective programs engage children in hands-on activities where good character is emphasized throughout the school environment as well as through the curriculum. 

While studies show 93% of teachers support Character Education in schools, these teachings are most effective when they start in our homes.

Whether you are a parent, educator, friend or family member, each and every one of us who comes in contact with a child plays an important role in their development. 

It’s time to stop asking who is responsible. We are all responsible for helping to guide today’s children into compassionate, kind and confident young adults of tomorrow.

With time ticking and the need growing, The American School of Protocol® has created a new 1-Day Training Conference, Cultivating Character™ to help combat this crisis.

A Pre-K through High School series, Cultivating Character™ provides excellent benefits to anyone working closely with children.  Participants in Cultivating Character™ will receive the education and materials needed to become an influential instructor. 

For more information on Cultivating Character™ and how you can help click here

We have a huge problem on our hands.  Gun violence, mass murders, opioid crisis, and bullying.  America’s youth are in the front row of this chilling production.  

On February 14th Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, Florida had one of the world’s deadliest school massacres. The students who survived have since decided to take their pain and transform it into something useful that may actually bring about change.

Lorenzo Prado, a Parkland High school shooting survivor said, "To let these victims' lives be taken without any change in return is an act of treason to our great country. What we must do now is enact change because that is what we do to things that fail: We change them."

Even after one and a half months since the shooting, the students continue to stay strong in their protest and demand for change.

Peggy Newfield, President of The American School of Protocol in Atlanta, Georgia believes, “We need to focus on our children and the messages we are sending them.”

Newfield applauds the student’s organization and focus. “With all the skepticism thrown towards the youth and their protesting, many adults have lost sight that youth issues are community issues and community issues are our issues” asserts Newfield.  

Newfield is a strong promoter of empowering America’s youth. She has taught etiquette to over 10,000 students in the Atlanta area.

“Our youth are crying out for answers and begging for a new message. Our children are taking a stand and we need to be supportive” said one of the parent supporters at the March of Our Lives in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, March 24. 

On Sunday, the Pope spoke up and gave a poignant message to those who want to bring about change. “It is up to you not to keep quiet, even if others keep quiet.”

Stronger gun laws, mental health, school laws, bullying, anger management - - - the list goes on of where changes need to be made. Our children need a new message. 

A message of kindness, compassion, safety, and hope for the future.

There is only one month left of the official summer season!  Time is really flying.

One of the inevitable signals of fall approaching is when school begins.  This can be difficult for parents and children alike.  Especially if it is a very first school year.

The most important advice we offer is to keep the communication open with your child.  Talking – and listening – to them builds trust.  So when you tell your youngster that they will go to school and learn interesting things, have some fun, and you will meet them when class is over, they will believe you and not worry so much about what may happen while they are away from you.

Open communication is just as crucial for older children.  They deal with more on a daily basis than many adults can comprehend.  Or maybe we have simply forgotten.

The pressure to fit in, keep friends, make good grades, and achieve recognition in extra-curricular activities wears on many children.  Many of them are quite skilled at internalizing this pressure.  As we read in the headlines, this can be a dangerous thing.

Keep an open mind where your children are concerned.  The one place they truly need to feel accepted and recognized is at home. 

Spending quality time, and exercising verbal ability with your children, may be just what schools need.